blog

...now browsing by tag

 
 

“Bringing history to life” – Dan blogging on National Treasures Live

Sunday, September 4th, 2011

Dan’s written a blog for the BBC History Magazine website on putting together National Treasures Live.

Can history compete at prime time on Britain’s biggest channel? That was the challenge I was set by the BBC’s top brass. Me and a crack team of producers and researchers were told to come up with a history series that would bring popular history to the heart of BBC One.

We were given five slots, at 7.30pm – and we would be broadcasting live to the nation’s living rooms. The team assembled and the lengthy, intense and often amusing discussions began.
Click to continue »

Christmas has long been a time for gluttony | BBC History Magazine

Thursday, December 17th, 2009

Christmas is approaching; people are giving themselves over to wild excess, while misanthropes moan. They wail that Christmas has become a festival of excess, an orgy of licentiousness, a celebration of gluttony.

Since these are exactly the aspects of Christmas that I most enjoy, I bridle when told by misguided joyless folk that I am betraying the true spirit of Christmas. Particularly because anyone with a passing knowledge of the history of the midwinter festival now known as Christmas will know that ever since humans became capable of sharing a common culture, they have let their hair down and partied at the time of year when the days are shortest.

via Christmas has long been a time for gluttony | BBC History Magazine.

From William Pitt to American football | BBC History Magazine

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

The street was full of fans. They were doing what fans do: shouting, laughing, drinking as much beer as possible before it was confiscated at the gates of the stadium. The University of Pittsburgh were playing Connecticut State and the home fans were out in force. It was a typical Saturday afternoon and could have been any town in the English speaking world. But one thing made this crowd stand out from others – nearly all of them had the name of one of Britain’s most influential statesmen emblazoned across T-shirts, hoodies, baseball caps and even painted on their faces: PITT.

via From William Pitt to American football | BBC History Magazine.

A flutter of protest, and some dog-walkers | BBC History Magazine

Monday, September 14th, 2009

Yesterday was the 250th anniversary of the battle of Quebec, fought on 13 September 1759, on the Plains of Abraham outside the town of Quebec, the capital of France’s vast North American empire. It was a strange day – a large re-enactment had recently been cancelled due to protests made by French Canadian- Quebecois- Separatists.

via A flutter of protest, and some dog-walkers | BBC History Magazine.

From disaster at Upnor to triumph at Quiberon Bay | BBC History Magazine

Friday, August 28th, 2009

Dan’s started blogging for the BBC History magazine and his enblogginating can be found here.

“In one week I’ve gone from the very nadir of British maritime history to its zenith. On Monday I visited the excellent but low key Upnor Castle on the Medway, where in 1667 King Charles II had laid up his fleet ‘in ordinary’ because he had no money to send them to sea and no inclination to go to parliament and ask for more.”

via From disaster at Upnor to triumph at Quiberon Bay | BBC History Magazine.